Rationale

Anaphylaxis is a severe, rapidly progressive allergic reaction that is potentially life threatening. The most common allergens in school aged children are peanuts, eggs, tree nuts (e.g. cashews), cow’s milk, fish and shellfish, wheat, soy, sesame, latex, certain insect stings and medication.

The key to prevention of anaphylaxis in schools is knowledge of those students who have been diagnosed at risk, awareness of triggers (allergens), and prevention of exposure to these triggers. Partnerships between schools and parents are important in ensuring that certain foods or items are kept away from the student while at school.

Adrenaline given through an EpiPen autoinjector to the muscle of the outer mid-thigh is the most effective first aid treatment for anaphylaxis.

 

Aim

  • To comply with the Ministerial Order 706 and guidelines on Anaphylaxis Management.
  • To provide, as far as practicable, a safe and supportive environment in which students at risk of anaphylaxis can participate equally in all aspects of the student’s schooling.
  • To raise awareness about anaphylaxis and the school’s anaphylaxis management policy in the school community.
  • To engage with parents/carers of students at risk of anaphylaxis in assessing risks, developing risk minimisation strategies and management strategies for the student.
  • To ensure that each staff member has adequate knowledge about allergies, anaphylaxis and the school’s policy and procedures in responding to an anaphylactic reaction.

 

Management Plans

In February of each year the Annual Risk Management Checklist is undertaken.

The individual anaphylaxis management plan will be devised from the Action Plan and will be in place as soon as practicable after the student enrols.

The individual anaphylaxis management plan will set out the following:

  • Information about the diagnosis, including the type of allergy or allergies the student has (based on a diagnosis from a medical practitioner)
  • Strategies to minimise the risk of exposure to allergens while the student is under the care of supervision of school staff, for in-school and out of school settings including camps and excursions.
  • Information on where the student’s medication will be stored.
  • The student’s emergency contact details.
  • Anaphylaxis Action plan provided by the parent, that:
  • sets out the emergency procedures to be taken in the event of an allergic reaction
  • is signed by a medical practitioner who was treating the child on the date the
  • practitioner signs the Action Plan; and
  • includes an up to date photograph of the student.

The student’s individual management plan will be reviewed, in consultation with the student’s parents/carers Annually, and as applicable,

  • if the student’s condition changes
  • immediately after a student has an anaphylactic reaction at school
  • if a new Action Plan is submitted

It is the responsibility of the parent to:

  • provide an Anaphylaxis Action Plan
  • inform the school if their child’s medical condition changes

It is the responsibility of the OSHP to:

  • supervise the collection of the Student’s Epipen from the school office and ensure that the Epipen is taken home with the child at night
  • ensure the return of the Epipen to the school office when it is before school care

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Communication Plan

The principal is responsible for ensuring that a communication plan is developed to provide information to all staff, students and parents about anaphylaxis and the schools anaphylaxis management policy.

The communication plan will include information about what steps will be taken to respond to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in a classroom, in the school yard, on school excursions, on school camps and special event days. Anaphylaxis Policy 2014

 

Achieving Communication and awareness

Volunteers and casual relief staff of students at risk of anaphylaxis will be informed of students at risk of anaphylaxis and their role in responding to an anaphylactic reaction by a student in their care by photos and

Action and Management plans displayed in their specific classrooms and in specialists areas. Information can also be accessed in sickbay and in the staffroom.

Achieving Communication

  1. Time is allocated at the beginning of each year and semester at staff meetings to discuss, practise and review the school’s management strategies for students at risk of anaphylaxis, and providing and/or displaying copies of the student’s Action Plan in canteens, classrooms and staff rooms.
  2. Induction of new staff members will include briefing on students at risk of anaphylaxis, the school’s policies and prevention strategies.
  3. Students at risk of anaphylaxis have a container of treats to eat that are supplied by their parents when other students bring class treats for their birthdays.
  4. For classroom celebrations, students at risk of anaphylaxis eat food supplied by their parents.
  5. There is a ‘no food sharing’ policy between students at St Charles Borromeo.

 

Peer support is an important element of support for students at risk of anaphylaxis. Some students at risk of anaphylaxis may not want to be singled out or be seen to be treated differently.

Class teachers discuss the topic with students in class and at parent/teacher interviews identifying simple key messages:

  • Always take food allergies seriously
  • Do not share your food
  • Wash your hands after eating
  • Know what your friend is allergic to
  • If a friend becomes sick, get help immediately
  • Do not pressure your friends to eat food that they are allergic to

 

Staff Training and Emergency Response

All St. Charles Borromeo staff members are trained annually by an accredited First Aid Training Company.

Teachers and other school staff who conduct classes with students at risk of anaphylaxis, or give instruction to students at risk of anaphylaxis, must have up to date training in an anaphylaxis management training course.

At other times while the student is under the care or supervision of the school, including excursions, yard duty, camps and special event days, the principal must ensure that there is a sufficient number of staff present who has up to date training in an anaphylaxis management training course.

All staff will be briefed at the beginning of 2nd semester by a qualified staff member who has up to date anaphylaxis management training on:

  • The school’s anaphylaxis policy.
  • The causes, symptoms and treatment of anaphylaxis.
  • The identities of students diagnosed at risk of anaphylaxis and where their medication is located.
  • How to use an autoadrenaline injecting device.
  • The school’s first aid and emergency response procedures.
  • A DVD kept in the Anaphylaxis kit in sick bay.

A register is kept at the office, showing details of staff training. Initial training will take place before the student’s first day at school.

The school’s first aid procedures, the students Anaphylaxis Action Plan and the student’s Individual Anaphylaxis Management Plan will be followed in responding to an anaphylactic reaction.

 

Action Plan for Anaphylaxis

Emergency Procedure

If reaction occurs outside on the Yard during RECESS or LUNCH:-

  1. Yard duty Teacher to stay with child.
  2. Teacher to give a student, preferably two students, photo identification card from bumbag to bring to office and to communicate to office via walkie talkie.
  3. Remove the allergen, if known, from the vicinity of the child.
  4. Trained person takes affected child’s EpiPen from First Aid Room (next to office area)  to child.
  5. Allocated person rings for an ambulance on mobile phone and takes phone to child, to relay to paramedic the child’s current condition. - ASK FOR MICA UNIT, STATING EPIPEN WAS GIVEN AND THE TIME IT WAS ADMINISTERED. Advise the ambulance officer that the school has another EpiPen if needed. STATE WHICH GATE AMBULANCE IS TO ENTER THROUGH – Serpells Road Do Not Hang Up!
  6. School Emergency Management Plan will be put into place if required.
  7. Principal or Deputy or Office Staff to notify parents.
  8. Nominated Staff to wait at nominated gate to guide ambulance.
  9. Principal or Deputy or nominated staff member to travel to hospital with child if parents have not arrived.

 

If reaction occurs in CLASSROOM or SPECIALIST lesson:-

  1. Teacher will use Intercom to alert office that Epipen is required.
  2. Principal or Deputy or Office Staff to take Epipen to child.
  3. Office to ring ambulance on mobile phone and take phone to child, to relay to paramedic the child’s current condition. - ASK FOR MICA UNIT, STATING EPIPEN WAS GIVEN AND THE TIME IT WAS ADMINISTERED. Advise the ambulance officer that the school has another EpiPen if needed. STATE WHICH GATE AMBULANCE IS TO ENTER THROUGH. – Serpells Road Do Not Hang Up!
  4. Principal or Deputy or staff member to go to classroom to assist teacher.
  5. Principal or Deputy or Office Staff to notify parents.
  6. Office staff to wait at nominated gate to guide ambulance.
  7. Principal or Deputy or staff member to travel to hospital with child if parents have not arrived.

 

EXCURSION OR SCHOOL CAMP:-

  1. All staff members attending camp/ excursion and camp personnel are aware of children with special medical needs.
  2. Responsible First Aider to ensure the student’s Epipen bag is with the student on the way to and from camp/excursion.
  3. A spare school Epipen will be taken to camps/excursions.
  4. Supervisory First Aider to ensure that the child’s Epipen bag is kept at the 1st Aid station while at camp and with them while on outside activities and kept with classroom teacher while on excursions.

 

If a reaction occurs at camp/on excursions:-

  1. Trained personnel to administer Epipen.
  2. Other staff member to ring ambulance on mobile phone and take phone to child, to relay to paramedic the child’s current condition. - ASK FOR MICA UNIT, STATING EPIPEN WAS GIVEN AND THE TIME IT WAS ADMINISTERED. Advise the ambulance officer that the school has another EpiPen if needed. STATE ADDRESS FOR AMBULANCE Do Not Hang Up!
  3. Another nominated staff member to wait for ambulance.
  4. Coordinator to ring parents and school.
  5. Staff member to travel to hospital with child.

Epipens are in the First Aid Room – MAKE SURE THE NAME AND PHOTO OF THE CHILD MATCH. Under no circumstances give another child’s Epipen.

Spare EpiPens are kept in the First Aid Room.

  • Possible Signs and Symptoms
  • Hives/Rash
  • Facial swelling
  • Tingling in or around mouth
  • Abdominal pain/vomiting/diarrhoea
  • Cough or wheeze
  • Difficulty breathing or swallowing
  • Breathing stops
  • Loss of consciousness or collapse

 

All parents of children who require an Epipen are required to complete an Action plan for Anaphylaxis with a photo and a Doctor’s signature. It is parent’s responsibility to ensure that their child’s Epipen is current.

 

A guide to calling an EMERGENCY AMBULANCE
Dial 000 Ask for ambulance

Be prepared to answer the following questions:

  • What is the exact location of the emergency? – 230 Serpells Road– Melbourne Victoria
  • Nearest intersection? – Williamson Road and Serpells Road
  • What is the number of the phone you are calling from? 9842 7634
  • What is the problem?/What exactly happened?
  • How many people are hurt?
  • What is the age of the patient?
  • Is the patient conscious?
  • Is the patient breathing?

 

DON’T HANG UP. FURTHER QUESTIONS MAY BE REQUIRED TO DETERMINE THE NECESSARY AMBULANCE RESPONSE.

 

To Assist Ambulance:

  • Answer each question calmly, accurately
  • Ensure the property is clearly identifiable
  • Have someone wait outside for the ambulance
  • Have any current medication ready

 

Evaluation:

This policy will be reviewed as part of the school’s review cycle or earlier as required.

This policy was written by Leadership Team

This policy will be reviewed in September 2015.